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Should I Replace Ignition Coils with Spark Plugs?

by | Sep 22, 2022

The ignition system in your car is a crucial component of its operation.

It’s responsible for turning the fuel and air mixture in the carburetor into self-sustaining combustion that keeps your car running.

When it fails, it’s necessary to have a mechanic inspect and fix it as soon as possible to ensure no additional damage occurs.

Ignition coils should be regularly inspected for signs of wear and deterioration, but some owners choose to replace spark plugs with ignitions instead.

If you do not know how an ignition coil works or what it entails, then you should probably leave this option until later.

It is an electronic device that controls the timing of the spark generated by the spark plugs in each cylinder.

Because they are mounted on a fixed axis in pairs known as leads, they can operate independently from each other when there’s an absence of voltage above 4 volts DC.

This allows them to fire reliably even when dirty or wet while preventing misfiring or double firing.

What is an Ignition Coil?

The ignition coil is a device that’s connected to the spark plug.

In essence, they help transform the current into a spark that ignites the fuel and air mixture in the carburetor.

They are mounted on fixed axles or leads, which allows them to be independent of each other when there’s an absence of voltage above 4 volts DC.

The spark generated by the ignition coil creates a path for current to flow through as it generates electricity.

Spark Plug Wire Group

Each spark plug is connected to its own coil, which is mounted on the engine’s head.

The ignition system starts with the spark plug wire group that includes all of the wires connecting each coil in a particular cylinder.

This group is then connected to their appropriate plugs, which are mounted on the distributor cap and rotor.

The distributor cap contains a rotating magnetic field that generates sparks and sends them to each of the spark plugs in turn by controlling the timing of when they fire and how many they shoot out at one time.

How Does an Ignition Coil Work?

If you’re in a rush to replace your ignition coils with spark plugs, you might be unaware of the workings.

Here is a brief explanation of how an ignition coil works: An electricity-producing magnet is mounted near the flywheel of your engine.

This magnet makes it easy for voltage pulses to flow into the coil at high speed through the leads.

The electricity then flows through an armature, the movable part that gets triggered by voltage.

It then passes through the primary winding, which consists of wire wrapped around a core, and finally travels to the secondary winding, which consists of wire wound around a core.

A spark wheel is connected to both ends of this secondary winding and completes the circuit for generating sparks when electricity hits it at precisely 4 volts DC or greater (based on compression ratio).

The sparks from these ignitions are used to create air/fuel mixture that explodes as soon as they reach their respective cylinders.

When Should you Replace Spark Plugs with Coils?

It is best to replace ignition coils when you’re not doing any other work on the car.

When replacing parts, it is important to have a professional mechanic check your spark plugs for misfires and other issues before taking them out.

This will ensure that the coil and spark plugs are replaced in the correct order.

If your car has been sitting for some time and you’ve neglected maintenance, then you might want to replace the spark plugs with an ignition coil or both.

Coils can be expensive, so this may just be a temporary solution until you get around to getting your oil changed and fixing other issues.

However, if you do not change anything else but replace the spark plugs with an ignition coil, then it should last for a while.

Pros and Cons of Spark Plug Wire Groups

You should know that spark plug wires are anchored to the engine block or head in a predetermined position.

In other words, they cannot be moved.

They also have a small wire at their tip that’s connected to the ignition coil, which generates a spark when it receives voltage from the battery.

The main advantage of using spark plugs is that they can create sparks even when you don’t have voltage because they are not dependent on the ground.

The disadvantage is that they generate fewer sparks than an ignition coil, and so they can sometimes cause misfires or double fires.

Which spark plug wire group should you choose?

The wires that are used to connect the coils together are known as current flow wire groups.

These wire groups should be chosen carefully according to the vehicle’s model year.

You should always consult your manufacturer’s service manual for guidance on what wire group is compatible with your specific car.

When it comes to the selection of current flow wire groups, you have some options.

The most common option is the 16-wire group, which allows for a smoother idle with less vibration and sound.

You can also choose a 12- or 14-wire group if you have less power in your engine.

Finally, you can choose a 10- or 11-wire group if you have more power in your engine and want to get rid of excess noise and vibration.

Final Words

When you’re considering replacing your ignition coils with spark plugs, this decision should be made after a mechanic has inspected it for you.

You should assess whether or not the benefits of this replacement outweigh the risks.

If you have any further questions or concerns, contact a professional mechanic and they can provide you with all the information that you need to make a sound decision.

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